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New photography site

photography poster brochure book cover flyer wall art postcards

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#1 Borjazz

Borjazz

    Senior Member

  • Designer
  • 101 posts

Posted 25 July 2018 - 05:41 PM

Dear designers,

I've created a website with nice b&w and color photographies.

They can be useful for those designs involving pictures...or maybe as a decoration item.

Check them out!

Update (22 October 2018): I'm no longer with SmugMug. I'm moving to

https://fineartameri...rja-robles.html

Thanks!


  • Babba, Markonije, DesignBear and 1 other like this

#2 mahdiduri37

mahdiduri37

    Senior Member

  • Designer
  • 279 posts

Posted 25 July 2018 - 05:59 PM

It's Cool!


  • Borjazz likes this

#3 sharie

sharie

    Admin

  • Administrators
  • 21543 posts

Posted 25 July 2018 - 11:43 PM

Share some photography tops  :)



Like us on facebook


#4 Borjazz

Borjazz

    Senior Member

  • Designer
  • 101 posts

Posted 26 July 2018 - 12:39 AM

Share some photography tops  :)

Sharie you're really one of the "tops" here!  :p

As requested, I'll share some digital photography "tips":

 

1.- Shoot in RAW. Use jpeg only if you're in a hurry. RAW keeps the whole info of the picture (like wav to mp3 comparison), and maybe it's not useful to you by now but later, if you progress in your photo skills, you will regret not having all of your pics in RAW.

 

2.- Get a pro software like Adobe Lightroom, DxO Photolab or Capture One. They will make your average pics look really great (with some patience). I prefer Adobe's solution, because it's the more widely used, so there are zillions of tutorials out there. Concentrate on one picture and spend time tweaking. One first step is to auto correct the pic and see what changes the app has done and check them with the original pic, it will familiarize you with the parameters.

 

3.- Avoid using Instagram filters. Or any mainstream filters, you won't learn anything by doing so.

 

4.- Spend some time on webs like 500px or Smugmug, there are others, but this two are one of the best I've tried. They show you the camera equipment the photographer used, so it's good for knowing about apertures, shutter speeds, focal distances, etc..

 

5.- Flickr is (almost) dead. It has been acquired by Smugmug. You can still use it as a cloud storage for your tons of smartphone pics, but it's not anymore seriously consider among pro users.

 

6.- Buy a camera with interchangeable lenses. DSLR or mirrorless. The two key concepts here are the camera sensor and the lens itself. A good starting point could be a 18-55mm lens, a 24-70mm lens or a prime one like the 35mm(for DX cameras) or 50mm (for FX cameras). These two primes simulates how the human eye watches a scene.

 

7.- A final advice (by now). Think twice before shooting. Wait to compose the scene you want to capture. Analyze the light, the focal length, the framing, etc. We're all tired of doing 2089328 shoots on the same subject, just to find the best one because we have a memory card and not a film roll...

 

Thanks for reading!


  • sharie, HerbertNordal, Babba and 4 others like this

#5 nullobject

nullobject

    Guru

  • Designer
  • 513 posts

Posted 27 July 2018 - 04:25 AM

Hey Borjazz, Congratulations!

"Neuschwanstein" is my fav so far.. a real Disney castle!

 

Thanks and wish you the best!


  • Borjazz likes this

Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication Leonardo da Vinci


#6 KristineHarmon

KristineHarmon

    Junior Member

  • Client
  • 5 posts

Posted 18 February 2019 - 10:55 AM

That's really cool.


  • Borjazz likes this

#7 josephstanberry

josephstanberry

    Junior Member

  • Client
  • 1 posts

Posted 25 July 2019 - 02:53 PM

Very nice! 


  • Borjazz likes this

#8 AnniGraphics

AnniGraphics

    Junior Member

  • Designer
  • 1 posts

Posted 11 October 2021 - 06:44 AM

Thanks for sharing



#9 RaisaLee

RaisaLee

    Junior Member

  • Client
  • 1 posts

Posted 14 February 2022 - 11:29 AM

Sharie you're really one of the "tops" here!  :p

As requested, I'll share some digital photography "tips":

 

1.- Shoot in RAW. Use jpeg only if you're in a hurry. RAW keeps the whole info of the picture (like wav to mp3 comparison), and maybe it's not useful to you by now but later, if you progress in your photo skills, you will regret not having all of your pics in RAW.

 

2.- Get a pro software like Adobe Lightroom, DxO Photolab or Capture One. They will make your average pics look really great (with some patience). I prefer Adobe's solution, because it's the more widely used, so there are zillions of tutorials out there. Concentrate on one picture and spend time tweaking. One first step is to auto correct the pic and see what changes the app has done and check them with the original pic, it will familiarize you with the parameters.

 

3.- Avoid using Instagram filters. Or any mainstream filters, you won't learn anything by doing so.

 

4.- Spend some time on webs like 500px or Smugmug, there are others, but this two are one of the best I've tried. They show you the camera equipment the photographer used, so it's good for knowing about apertures, shutter speeds, focal distances, etc..

 

5.- Flickr is (almost) dead. It has been acquired by Smugmug. You can still use it as a cloud storage for your tons of smartphone pics, but it's not anymore seriously consider among pro users.

 

6.- Buy a camera with interchangeable lenses. DSLR or mirrorless. The two key concepts here are the camera sensor and the lens itself. A good starting point could be a 18-55mm lens, a 24-70mm lens or a prime one like the 35mm(for DX cameras) or 50mm (for FX cameras). These two primes simulates how the human eye watches a scene.

 

7.- A final advice (by now). Think twice before shooting. Wait to compose the scene you want to capture. Analyze the light, the focal length, the framing, etc. We're all tired of doing 2089328 shoots on the same subject, just to find the best one because we have a memory card and not a film roll...

 

Thanks for reading!

Thanks a lot for sharing them with us. I was searching for it for my friend. I will surely share that website link with my friend. I also want to buy college term paper with the help of this https://studyclerk.com/buy-term-paper website. Can you please share a site with me in which I can find reviews for that website and can also compare it with other sites too?







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