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How to Design a Sporty Logo

Best Sports LogosIt’s time to dive into some specific logo examples, as well as offer up a few pointers on how to create similarly awesome designs within your own projects. One of the first items we’d like to look at is the realm of sports logos. It’s a huge market, what with everything from little league teams all the way up to major league action. However, if you’re new to the area, and aren’t really sure what constitutes a dramatically good sports logo, we understand your pain. 

  1. Add A Lot of Motion: If you’re new to the art school way of thinking about graphic design, let us be the first to break you in—if you’ll pardon the metaphor. You see, traditionally in art terms a design that uses a lot of angles and bent lines is seen as being more dramatic, or more in motion. This has existed since time immemorial, and we promise it’s not something we made up. Sports is by nature an active and exciting thing, which means you should always reflect this when creating a logo for a sports team or organization. To do so, simply add some angled lines and smooth curves to the overall look. If you need examples, think about companies like Nike, which uses one big swoop to portray itself as sporty. This is your goal, and you should try with each new stroke to reach for it.
  2. Use Vibrant Colors: If you aren’t using a lot of bright colors in your sparklingly sporty design, you’re selling yourself and your client short. You see, bright or warm hues are inviting and action-oriented, as opposed to cool blues and greens and the like. When creating a logo that screams fitness, fun, and action, you’re obviously going to want to avoid colors that don’t compliment that. Throw in some oranges, add some reds, and maybe even break out some of those yellows you commonly shy away from (don’t worry, we do that, too.) Either way, make the logo vibrant, wholesome, and eye-catching to evoke properly fit thoughts.

Posted on May 4, 2012

Category: Designing, General

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